Thematic Areas

Collaboration with the International Women's Human Rights Clinic

2011-2012

The Issue in Brief

The O’Neill Institute and Georgetown Law's International Women's Human Rights Clinic (IWHRC) have an ongoing collaboration to advance the health of marginalized women through a human rights-based approach. This collaboration brings together the O’Neill Institute with partners inside, and external to, Georgetown Law.

In Spring 2012, the IWHRC commenced drafting a human rights report and proposed model legislation to improve fulfillment of women's reproductive rights in Uganda, particularly on issues of access to contraception and safe termination of pregnancy. O’Neill personnel advised and work with clinical students on international human rights law as it pertains to these issues, particularly from a right to health approach.

Additionally, O’Neill Institute law fellow Alexandra Jones traveled with clinical staff and students in March 2012 to conduct human rights fact finding in Kampala and rural Uganda to inform the report. Interviews were conducted to gain a better understanding of women's experiences in a country with one of the world's highest fertility rates, and also greatest unmet need for contraception. The O’Neill fellow collaborated with members of local partner, Law-Uganda, and international NGO partner, The Center for Reproductive Rights, to conduct interviews with local, state, and national government officials, judges, health practitioners, men and women in a variety of types of marriage, traditional authorities, and care providers, among others. Since returning from the fact-finding mission, Ms. Jones has worked with clinical students to finalize their human rights reports.


2010-2011

The Issue in Brief

The O’Neill Institute and Georgetown Law's International Women's Human Rights Clinic (IWHRC) have an ongoing collaboration to advance the health of marginalized women through a human rights-based approach. This collaboration enhances the O’Neill Institute with different partners at Georgetown Law.

In Spring 2011, the IWHRC will draft a human rights report and propose model legislation to address the ways in which certain customary and traditional laws in Kenya, namely those that permit polygyny and the employment act that has loopholes for child domestic workers, may: (1) discriminate against women; (2) leave women particularly vulnerable to HIV/AIDS; (3) fail to protect young women and children's rights to health and education and (4) be incompatible with Kenya's international and national civil law obligations. O’Neill personnel will advise clinical students on international human rights law as it pertains to HIV prevention and treatment as well as the physical and mental health impact on child domestic workers and on the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in Kenya.

Additionally, O’Neill Institute law fellow, Di Wu will travel with clinical staff and students in March 2011 as the conduct human rights investigations in Kenya. The investigations aim to assess mechanisms by which disempowerment leaves women vulnerable to HIV and adversely affects children's rights to health and education, and government obligations to intervene. The O’Neill fellow will supervise telephone conferences with the local partner, FIDA Kenya, and interviews with local, state, and national government officials, judges, men and women in polygamous/monogamous marriages, traditional authorities, and care providers, among other stakeholders. Upon returning from the fact-finding mission, Ms. Wu will advise clinical students on the health components of their human rights reports.


2009-2010

The Issue in Brief

The O’Neill Institute and Georgetown Law's International Women's Human Rights Clinic (IWHRC) have an ongoing collaboration to advance the health of marginalized women through a human rights-based approach. This collaboration enhances the O’Neill Institute with different partners at Georgetown Law.

In Spring 2010, the IWHRC will draft a human rights report and propose model legislation to address the ways in which certain customary and traditional laws in Namibia, namely those that permit polygyny and widow disinheritance, may: (1) discriminate against women; (2) leave women particularly vulnerable to HIV/AIDS; and (3) be incompatible with Namibia's international and national civil law obligations. O’Neill personnel will advise clinical students on international human rights law as it pertains to HIV prevention and treatment and on the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in Namibia.

Additionally, O’Neill Institute law fellow, Rebecca Haffajee accompanied clinical staff and students in March 2010 as they conducted human rights investigations in Namibia. The investigations aimed to assess mechanisms by which disempowerment leaves women vulnerable to HIV, and government obligations to intervene. The O’Neill fellow supervised interviews with local, state, and national government officials, women living with HIV and at high risk of infection, traditional authorities, and care providers, among other stakeholders. Upon returning from the fact-finding mission, Ms. Haffajee will advise clinical students on the health components of their human rights reports.

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